Unless cybersecurity risks in the metaverse are considered, companies may not perceive the success they're hoping for.

Cybersecurity firm Check Point reported a 50% rise in overall attacks per week on corporate networks in 2021 compared to a year earlier. However, as businesses rush to plant their flag in the metaverse, not all may realize the full dangers of this new world.

Unless cybersecurity risks in the metaverse are considered, companies may not perceive the success they're hoping for.

Cybercrime in the real world is already turning more rampant.

As the contours and potential of the metaverse are yet to be fully realized, the overt concerns around privacy and security issues in the metaverse remain confined to only a few 'tech-aware' companies.

As new attack vectors emerge, people will require a basic realignment of today's security paradigms to identify, verify and secure the metaverse.

Identity security

User identification & privacy safeguards as significant elements for interacting and transacting in the metaverse.

Verifiable credentials [should be] simply structured to allow easier identification of fellow community or team members or to enable configurable access to varying virtual world locations and experiences.

A similar mindset for internet security needs to be applied to the metaverse, adding that security protocols should be as user-interactive as possible.

People see at blockchain to recognize users or use tokens that an organization could assign or biometrics in a headset you're wearing, so there's that level of trust, so you know who you're talking to.

Having "little exclamation marks" above avatars' heads signals that a person is unreliable.

Data breaches

As users leave traces of data around the metaverse, one major issue in the real world may also cross into the virtual reality world — the assault on user privacy by tech companies.

For example, millions of users' data were gathered and used without consent. Unfortunately, in the metaverse, even more, data may be available for these companies to feed on if strict regulations are not implemented to protect users.

When users wear virtual reality headsets, organizations can collect data like their head, eye movement, or voice.

Actually, within a few seconds, we can identify that you are wearing the device. So this is a major potential privacy problem for the virtual world.

What can be done

For businesses to operate in the metaverse safely, they must train staff well.

The soft spot in any organization from a cybersecurity perspective is the user.

The base of the metaverse has to be done well Since if the foundation is weak and not done well, people will lose confidence in the platform, and we'll stop using it.

If an attack reaches the metaverse, users will be in a stronger position if they have that level of training and understanding of what is doubtful.

While companies should implement risk mitigation strategies, Maintaining privacy ultimately depends on the type of security platforms and safety models the metaverse puts in place for organizations.

Mentioning LinkedIn, a professional networking site, as an example, users would need to be able to use a "web of trust" to exchange information with others to establish trust more easily.

He added that identifying people you trust and sharing that information with other trusted people will allow you to assess whether you have friends in common with someone new.

Meanwhile, companies involved in designing the metaverse would have to work together to establish a common standard that will allow security protocols to be utilized effectively.

The base of the metaverse has to be finished well since if the foundation is weak and not done well, people will lose confidence in the platform, and we'll stop using it.